Browse Items (12 total)

16759028-2011_041_001_Bpa_ARC.tif
Vol. I, Plate II from Le Antichita Romane

16759029-2010_020_001_Bpa_ARC.tif
From "Le Vedute di Roma"

11008212-2006_012_001_Apa_ARC.tif
The marble arch, at the summit of the Sacred Way at the southern end of the Roman Forum, commemorates the 71 triumph of Titus and his father Vespasian celebrating their conquest of Judaea. It was erected in 81 by Domitian (81-96) after his brother's…

11008257-2005_089_001_Apa_ARC.tif
The Pantheon, dedicated to all the gods, was built by the emperor Hadrian (117-138) between 118 and 128 to replace a temple dedicated by Marcus Agrippa in 27 BC. Hadrian, with characteristic tact, left the credit to Agrippa in the inscription on the…

11008250-2005_082_001_Bpa_ARC.tif
The Castel Sant' Angelo was originally built as the Mausoleum of Hadrian (117-138), begun by the emperor in the 120s and completed one year after his death. The tomb consisted of a square base with marble statues of men and horses at each corner. …

11008237-2005_035_001_Apa_ARC.tif
The story of how this obelisk came to be in the piazza of the Lateran spans three thousand years. It was first quarried by Thutmose III around 1450 BC and stood at the Temple of Amun at Karnak. When the emperor Augustus (27 BC-14 AD) had the first…

11008099-2005_002_002_Apa_ARC.tif
Piranesi here has let his imagination run wild to create a capriccio, or fantasy, of ancient Rome, but it is a fantasy with a basis in archaeological fact. Although he has labeled the subject as the "ancient Circus of Mars," it is clear from the…

11008236-2005_002_001_Apa_ARC.tif
Once Egypt had become a province of the Empire in 30 BC, many Romans began to display a taste for all things Egyptian. Caius Cestius, who held several prominent offices under the emperor Augustus (27 BC-14 AD), indulged this taste by constructing…

11008102-2003_072_001_Dpa_ARC.tif
The fourth of Piranesi's treatments of the Colosseum is one of the most remarkable of his vedute. He reveals the overall plan and the interior as if seen from the air, exposing the masses of masonry that supported the seating. The amphitheater…

11008293-2003_059_001_Cpa_ARC.tif
The Porta Maggiore stands on a site crucial to the development of Rome, where nine of its eleven aqueducts entered the city. From this site, called "Ancient Hope" in the Republican era, the aqueducts diverged to carry water to all parts of the city.…
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